Our blog
The value of antibiotics
Heather Graz

It is increasingly widely accepted that, in the evolving world of healthcare and health economics, a way of demonstrating value is essential. Exactly how this concept of value should be defined and, on a more practical note, how it can best be quantified, remains to be agreed.  

This lack of consensus has significance across all avenues of drug development. It has even more significant implications, though, for the development of new antimicrobial measures, where a particularly stark tension exists between supply- and demand-related factors.

Scenarios, for example, where it is cheaper to buy antibiotics than to pay for clean water reflect this disparity at a practical level. They highlight the need for workable solutions to be found that address both the scientific and the economic aspects of developing and delivering new and improved antimicrobial interventions.

Much is being done at a grassroots level to meet this challenge head on. Recommendations from the recent O’Neill reports highlight a broad range of intervention avenues for both industry and public healthcare players to adopt. These cross disciplines and include scientific, policy and financial recommendations. The need to revisit reimbursement and funding options for developers of new solutions is recognised amongst these. More discussion than action has however taken place around this hurdle. At the heart of this situation lies the need for a satisfactory way to be developed to allow us to quantify the communal and individual value of antimicrobial interventions.

Ultimately, the challenge of managing antimicrobials in modern society may well depend in large part on how the economics of the situation are handled. Some commentators have said that what is needed is a workable reimbursement programme that is accepted globally. Is this realistic or too big an ask and how do we align and combine subjective and objective components of the concept of value into a tool with universal applicability? Time will tell. In the meantime, feel free to join the conversation about what value looks like in the development of novel antimicrobial interventions.

Comments

No comments available

Note: All comments will be moderated before being published.

Our blog
The value of antibiotics
Heather Graz

It is increasingly widely accepted that, in the evolving world of healthcare and health economics, a way of demonstrating value is essential. Exactly how this concept of value should be defined and, on a more practical note, how it can best be quantified, remains to be agreed.  

This lack of consensus has significance across all avenues of drug development. It has even more significant implications, though, for the development of new antimicrobial measures, where a particularly stark tension exists between supply- and demand-related factors.

Scenarios, for example, where it is cheaper to buy antibiotics than to pay for clean water reflect this disparity at a practical level. They highlight the need for workable solutions to be found that address both the scientific and the economic aspects of developing and delivering new and improved antimicrobial interventions.

Much is being done at a grassroots level to meet this challenge head on. Recommendations from the recent O’Neill reports highlight a broad range of intervention avenues for both industry and public healthcare players to adopt. These cross disciplines and include scientific, policy and financial recommendations. The need to revisit reimbursement and funding options for developers of new solutions is recognised amongst these. More discussion than action has however taken place around this hurdle. At the heart of this situation lies the need for a satisfactory way to be developed to allow us to quantify the communal and individual value of antimicrobial interventions.

Ultimately, the challenge of managing antimicrobials in modern society may well depend in large part on how the economics of the situation are handled. Some commentators have said that what is needed is a workable reimbursement programme that is accepted globally. Is this realistic or too big an ask and how do we align and combine subjective and objective components of the concept of value into a tool with universal applicability? Time will tell. In the meantime, feel free to join the conversation about what value looks like in the development of novel antimicrobial interventions.


Comments

No comments available

Note: All comments will be moderated before being published.