No escape for ESKAPE pathogens

The World Health Organization (WHO) recognises antimicrobial resistance as one of the three most important human health concerns. This is because of the mismatch between the effectiveness and availability of antibiotics that continue to work against bacteria on the one hand, and the slow rate of development of suitable alternatives on the other hand.

The 6 so-called ESKAPE bacteria (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter) are key culprits in the rise in resistance to existing antibiotic measures. They have been found in up to 65% of ICU infections and similarly significant numbers in community-acquired infections around the world.  

Antimicrobial resistance amongst gram-negative bacteria has evolved in severity from multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobials), through extreme drug resistance (susceptibility to two or fewer classes of antimicrobials) to pan-drug resistance (diminished susceptibility to all classes of antimicrobials). 60% of these ESKAPE bacteria are gram-negative. Many of them show extreme or pan-drug resistance.

Neem has particular know how when it comes to gram-negative bacteria. We have the luxury of a depth of in-house chemistry and biology knowledge. This means that we can combine computational and medicinal chemistry thinking with pharmaceutical microbiology and drug development expertise to generate and trial novel ways of working around antimicrobial resistance in the critical and high priority categories of the WHO’s list of Priority Pathogens.

No escape for ESKAPE pathogens

The World Health Organization (WHO) recognises antimicrobial resistance as one of the three most important human health concerns. This is because of the mismatch between the effectiveness and availability of antibiotics that continue to work against bacteria on the one hand, and the slow rate of development of suitable alternatives on the other hand.

The 6 so-called ESKAPE bacteria (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter) are key culprits in the rise in resistance to existing antibiotic measures. They have been found in up to 65% of ICU infections and similarly significant numbers in community-acquired infections around the world.  

Antimicrobial resistance amongst gram-negative bacteria has evolved in severity from multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobials), through extreme drug resistance (susceptibility to two or fewer classes of antimicrobials) to pan-drug resistance (diminished susceptibility to all classes of antimicrobials). 60% of these ESKAPE bacteria are gram-negative. Many of them show extreme or pan-drug resistance.

Neem has particular know how when it comes to gram-negative bacteria. We have the luxury of a depth of in-house chemistry and biology knowledge. This means that we can combine computational and medicinal chemistry thinking with pharmaceutical microbiology and drug development expertise to generate and trial novel ways of working around antimicrobial resistance in the critical and high priority categories of the WHO’s list of Priority Pathogens.